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Aggressive driving comes with serious consequences
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Aggressive driving comes with serious consequences

When you hear of aggressive driving, many things may come to mind. However, the state considers a variety of specific actions as aggressive driving, which are also unlawful.

Aggressive driving differs from road rage, but it still can put others’ lives in danger. As a result, someone who faces an aggressive driving charge also faces unwanted penalties.

Aggressive driving vs road rage

The Arizona Department of Public Safety discusses the differences between an aggressive driver and one who commits road rage. Both present a hazard to another, but the biggest difference is that road rage consists of a specific and willful disregard for safety. Someone charged with road rage commits a criminal offense, while someone charged with aggressive driving commits a traffic offense.

Factors that constitute aggressive driving

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, an officer may charge you with aggressive driving if you are speeding, put another vehicle or person in immediate danger and commit two of the following:

  • Change lanes unsafely
  • Pass a vehicle on the right side
  • Fail to yield to an emergency vehicle
  • Follow too close to another vehicle
  • Fail to follow traffic signs or signals

For aggressive driving, these acts must occur during an uninterrupted driving period.

Penalties for an aggressive driving conviction

For the first offense conviction, there may be a 30-day license suspension, and the defendant must attend and complete a Traffic Survival course. For a second or subsequence offense within 24 months of the previous one, it is a class one misdemeanor, which includes a license revocation for 12 months and possible fines, jail time or both.

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